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June 29, 2016

3 New Canadian Databases on Ancestry

Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, Honeymoon and Visitor Registries, 1949-2011

·         Commonly known as the “Honeymoon Capital of the World”, Niagara Falls is visited by approximately 50,000 newlywed couples each year.

o   Fun fact: Niagara Falls received its reputation as the “Honeymoon Capital of the World” in 1801 when Theodosia Burr Alston (daughter of the 3rd Vice President of the United States, Aaron Burr), chose to honeymoon at the Falls. Napoleon Bonaparte’s brother, Jerome Bonaparte did the same in 1804, starting the popular tradition that continues today.

·         Many of the newlyweds who visit choose to sign their names in register books kept by the Niagara Falls Tourism Office, and now, these records have been digitized and indexed and are available online for Ancestry users.

·         The collection contains 680,114 records and 17,593 images from 1949 to 2011.

·         Exploring this collection, you’ll discover visitors who travelled near and far to the Falls, and how soon after their wedding they arrived.

·         The Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, Honeymoon and Visitor Registries, 1949-2011 are now available online on Ancestry.com and Ancestry.ca

Canada Photographic Albums of Settlement, 1892-1917


·         Just in time for Canada Day, Ancestry users can now access photos that paint a picture of what everyday life was like for Canadians during the early days of our nation.

·         Compiled by the Department of Interior, the collection contains 3,358 images, the majority of which were captured by John Woodruff and Horatio N. Topley. These photographers were hired by the Canadian government to capture the spirit of Canada during this period.

·         From the original logging process implemented to harvest one of Canada’s greatest resources, to the expansive ranches and wide open spaces of the true north in its original state, this collection details the life and times of some of Canada’s earliest settlers.

·         The Canada Photographic Albums of Settlement, 1892-1917 Collection is now available on Ancestry.com and Ancestry.ca

Canada Homestead Grant Registers, 1892-1930

·         To continue to shed light into life in Canada during its first few decades as a nation, Ancestry has launched a collection of registers of applications for land grants for the Western Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

·         Under the Dominion Land Acts in 1872, individuals could apply to homestead a quarter section of land (160 acres) and then apply for a patent (title) to the land after occupying and improving the land for three years. The average cost of land during this time was $10.

·         With 668,623 records and 78,794 images, Ancestry users can learn about some of Canada’s earliest settlers such as applicants’ names, region, date of application and homestead fee paid.

·         The Canada Homestead Grant Registers 1892-1930 Collection is now available on  Ancestry.com and Ancestry.ca

Credit: Images from Ancestry.com and Ancestry.ca 

June 27, 2016

Announcement: Family Search Upgrading

FamilySearch.org will undergo a technical upgrade on Monday, June 27, starting at 12:00 a.m. MDT (6:00 a.m. UTC). The site may be unavailable for up to 24 hours as they test the system improvements.

 It will be interesting to see what, if any, changes they make to the site! Meantime there are lots of other great sites genealogists can explore.


June 26, 2016

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album L6

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

Postcard. Group of soldiers and nurses
The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"


June 24, 2016

Naturalization Records, the often overlooked way to find a Ships Passenger List

We all want to know where our ancestors came from. We want to know when they arrived in North America and when they became citizens. Naturalization and immigration records are the answer.

Sometimes naturalization records for an ancestor are the only way to discover the family origins and that all-important ships passenger list.

Naturalization records can help you find the date of immigration, ship's passenger list, port of arrival, and the place of birth for your ancestor. Some naturalization records include occupations, names and ages of minor children, names and birth dates and places of spouses --- and more!

There is a wealth of genealogical information just waiting for you in your search for an ancestor. 

 NaturalizationRecords.com has links to online Naturalization records - many are projects published on the site and are free to view. Some links lead to various other websites and may be free or pay-to-view, depending on the site.
 
The following examples of various American Naturalization Documents shows you what type of information you might find. You can view these American Naturalization Record Documents on the NaturalizationRecords.com website

* 1795 Petition for Naturalization for Patrick Ryan in Pennsylvania
* 1906 Petition for Naturalization for Christopher Alt in Baltimore Maryland. Gives occupation, date and place of birth, date of immigration, port of departure and port of arrival, names of children plus dates and locations of births
* 1912 Petition for Naturalization for Jacob Imfang of Pittsburg Pennsylvania. Gives occupation, date and place of birth, date of immigration, port of departure and port of arrival, name of spouse, names of children plus dates and locations of births
* 1880 Naturalization Certificate includes name, age, country of origin
* 1891 Naturalization Certificate with name, date, country of origin
* 1922 Naturalization Certificate with name, age, physical description, wife's name, children's names and ages, country of origin
* 1925 Naturalization Certificate with name, age, physical description, wife's name, children's names and ages, current address, country of origin
* 1941 Naturalization Certificate with photo, name, age, physical description, marital status, country of origin, current address
* 1832 Declaration of Intent includes name, birthplace, age, settlement location
* 1846 Declaration of Intent for Daniel Stinger. Provides name of ancestor, current residence, age, country of origin,
* 1895 Declaration of Intent for Thomas Jones. Gives name, age, occupation, place and date of birth, physical description, current residence, name of ship sailed on, date of immigration, port of departure, port of arrival, last residence, marital status,
* 1937 Declaration of Intent for Pinchos aka Phillip Goldstein. Includes ancestor name, residence, occupation, physical description, race, nationality, place of birth, date of birth, name of spouse, place and date of marriage, Date and place of spouse's birth, year and port of immigration of spouse, current residence of spouse, number and names of children, location and dates of birth of children, year of immigration of ancestor, name of ship sailed on, port of departure, port of arrival, previous residence, actual name at immigration, and photograph

June 22, 2016

Burials, St. Paul's Church, Chester, Delaware Pennsylvania

Burials, St. Paul's Church, Chester, Delaware Pennsylvania

A recent bout of housecleaning, mainly purging and sorting my overstuffed filing cabinets brought these two images to light. Unfortunately I don't recall where I originally spotted them, so cannot give a source for the information. But I hope they will help you with an ancestor.  


 1822
Sept. 20. Maria Bond
Sept. 27. Isaac Bond
1823
Jan. 13 Charles McGee
May 8 Elizabeth Crosby
June 3 Elizabeth Fuller
Aug 3 John Noble
1825
Aug 30 Margaret Kerlin
Dec. 4 Edward Minshall, Sr.



1826
April 12. Matthias Richards Sayres
May 28. Henry G. Kerlin, service by Rev. J. M. Douglas
Sept. 23 Edward Hinshall
Sept. 12 Eliza Smith
1827
Feb. 28 Ann Eliza Crosby
Dec. 11. Joseph Piper
Dec. 25. Peter Deshong
1828
Feb. 12 John P. Crosby
July 6. Pierce Crosby Jr
July 14. John Liddons/Siddons
July 28. John Downes/Lownes
Sept. 21. Thomas Lyons
Sept. 28. David Veidy?
1829
Mar 4. John Hart of -- -- Graveyard
April 10 Elizabeth Davis
Dec. 17 Capt. William Anderson
1830
May 17. John Pierce, Snr, at the grounds of St. John Concord
July 19 Rebeccah Lownes






June 20, 2016

Updated! Almshouse (Poorhouse) Admission Records New York

One of the projects I have been working on over at Olive Tree Genealogy is records of Almshouses (poorhouses) and Orphan Homes, in particular for New York. Yesterday I updated the Almshouse Records for New York City.

These New York City Almshouse records are my favorite to work with as they contain details of admitted individuals' immigration to the City. Following are links for admission books from 1782 to 1858 (with gaps from 1840 to 1855). Please note that this is an ongoing project and not all records have been transcribed. These records are free for all to search, as are all record sets on Olive Tree Genealogy.

New York Almshouse 1782-1813 Surnames "A" | Surnames B | Surnames C. Records contain name of ancestor, date admitted, age, where from or born, complaint [illness], discharged, died, remarks.

Almshouse Records New York 1819-1840. These records contain Date of Admission; Foreigner (Surname); Foreigner (First Name); Age; Place of Birth; Vessel Name; Where From

Almshouse Records New York City 1855-1858. These records contain Date of Admission, Name, Age, Nativity, Time of Arrival, Port Sailed From, Port Arrived At, Ship, Captain, Married or Single, Who Can Identify Them, How Many Times on The Island, Remarks

Photo: Randall's Island House of Refuge, New York

June 19, 2016

Father's Day is Not a Happy Day for Me

 

Father's Day is a tough one for me. My father died one month after my 14th birthday. He was 47 years old. I think about him and miss him every day.

I wish he could have seen me grow up, marry and have children. I wish he could have met my children and my grandchildren.

Happy Father's Day to my wonderful, and deeply missed, father.

June 18, 2016

Immigrants proceeding to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819

I've been working on a project called Immigrants proceeding to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819


Immigrants to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819.  Pass for George Underhill
Pass #17236 George Underhill, Shropshire, butcher
I have extracted the names and basic information for each of the 199 people who applied for passes to leave New York and enter Upper Canada (present day Ontario)  The actual passes contain more information including age, place of origin, occupation, how many in family and sometimes detailed notes about the immigrant.

The passes begin at Image 33 with number 17228. To find an ancestor pass, just find the name in the list at Immigrants proceeding to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819 , copy the pass number then go to  Canadiana.org and paste the pass number into the search engine that says "Search within this reel"


For example one name on the list is


17236 George Underhill, Shropshire, butcher, wife + 4 ch

If this were your ancestor you would use the Canadiana.org link above and enter 17266 into the search engine on that site. You can see his pass above.
 
[Source: Upper Canada Sundries, Reference: RG 5 A1, Volume 37, passes numbered 17228-17578, microfilm: C-4601. Civil Secretary's Correspondence - Passes signed by British Consul, New York, for Emigrants from Great Britain, 1817-1819. Microfilm available at Canadiana.org but it is not indexed] 

June 17, 2016

Challenges We Face With Family or Pet Nicknames

This is Olive Tree Genealogy's latest article on Legacy Family Tree

Challenges We Face With Family or Pet NicknamesNames are important in genealogy research. But names can be confusing and can add challenges for the genealogist.

I've written previously about about surnames that were changed, either deliberately or accidentally, over generations in 5 Tips to Help You Navigate the Confusing Maze of Surname Variations.

There are other surname variations that genealogists can find confusing and challenging. See Oh Those Dit Names!  and  Dutch Patronymics: Confusing or Helpful?

These surname variations can make research into those families challenging! But genealogical research can also be confusing when our ancestors used nicknames, or alternated between using their first and middle names.

Besides the standard nicknames that we discover as we research our ancestors, what other variant names might we encounter along the path of filling out our family tree?

Continue reading  What’s In a Name? Challenges We Face With Family or Pet Nicknames

June 16, 2016

Canadians and Our Funny Ways, Eh

We Canadians are often teased for saying "oot and aboot" instead of "out and about". I've never thought that's how it sounds. I recognize that we do have a rather distinct Canadian accent but I hear us saying it as "owt and abowt", kind of  drawing out that vowel sound.

Finally I'm proven sort of right!! This is a fascinating article about the ancient origins of the Canadian pronunciation of certain words. And no, I'm not talking about our habit of putting "eh" at the end of sentences. And the end of questions. And... well just about anything.

"Eh" at the end of a sentence can be a question such as "Cold enough for ya, eh?". It can be a  note of emphasis such as "That's some good beer eh" (does not require an answer as beer is always good to a Canadian). It can be a statement "I don't know how that moose got here in my yard, eh."

That's just the tip of the "eh" iceberg but for now I really want my readers to read  What's Going On with the Way Canadians Say ‘About'?

While you're at it, if you haven't seen this video yet, you really should.  It's called Canadian Please


June 15, 2016

Update on Digitization of WW1 Files of Canadian Soldiers

Received from Library and Archives Canada (LAC) today:

As of today, 297,013 of 640,000 files are available online via our Soldiers of the First World War: 1914–1918 database. Please visit the Digitization of the Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files page for more details on the digitization project. Library and Archives Canada is digitizing the service files systematically, from box 1 to box 10686

So far, we have digitized the following files:
  • Latest box digitized: Box 5003 and Karpuk.

June 14, 2016

2000 Year Old Bog Butter Anyone?

Two thousand year old bog butter - that's right. A peat cutter in Ireland recently dug up a 22 lb of butter made 2000 years ago.

The Emlagh Bog turned up this unique gift from the past when Jack Conway, of Meath Ireland, was out cutting peat.

If you have Meath ancestors, perhaps one of them helped make this butter, or milked the cow for the milk that was used in it.

Read the whole story at "For peat’s sake! 2,000-years-old butter found in Irish bog"


June 13, 2016

Number 1 in Top 100 Genealogy Books

Imagine my surprise (and delight) when I spotted this last night on Amazon.

My book "Organize Your Genealogy in Evernote in 10 Easy Steps" is #1 in the Top 100 Genealogy books on Amazon!

Thank you to everyone who spent $1.34-$1.50 (It changes at Amazon's discretion) to read it and those who kindly left reviews. If you don't have your copy, here's the link

Organize Your Genealogy in Evernote in 10 Easy Steps available as an Ebook

June 12, 2016

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 65R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.
Fancy dress dance. Netheravon Manor

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"



June 11, 2016

TLC RENEWS WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? AND LONG LOST FAMILY FOR ADDITIONAL SEASONS

The following announcement was sent to Olive Tree Genealogy: 

TLC announced today that the network has ordered additional seasons of the fan favorite series WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? and freshman series LONG LOST FAMILY. The most recent seasons of both series averaged over 1.8M P2+ viewers.

Executive Produced by Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky, the two time Emmy-nominated WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? follows some of today's most beloved and iconic celebrities as they embark on personal journeys of self-discovery to trace their family trees. The most recent seasons have featured Bryan Cranston, who uncovered an ancestor’s heroic dedication during the Civil War, and Molly Ringwald, who learned about the dangerous conditions her coal-mining ancestors endured.

LONG LOST FAMILY features the highly emotional and touching stories of people who have suffered a lifetime of separation from their family members. The series reunites those separated by adoption, uncovers secrets behind unsolved mysteries, and helps individuals answer lifelong questions. This past season reunited several family members in emotional meetings, including a mother and a daughter who actually worked together and did not realize they were related. The series is hosted by Chris Jacobs and Lisa Joyner, who uniquely share their own stories of adoption while leading others in their own family discoveries.

Ancestry.com the leading provider of online family history data and personal DNA testing, is teaming up with TLC again as a sponsor of the upcoming seasons for both series. As part of the sponsorship, Ancestry provides exhaustive family history research to help make discoveries possible on both series.

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? is produced for TLC by Shed Media and Is or Isn’t Entertainment, and is based on an original format created by Wall to Wall Media and Alex Graham. LONG LOST FAMILY is produced for TLC by Shed Media, and is based on the format entitled Find My Family/Spoorloos devised by KRO-NCRV, distributed by Lineup Industries.

June 10, 2016

Announcement re 100 Million Dutch Records on Ancestry

The following announcement was sent to Olive Tree Genealogy yesterday:

Start LookingMore than 100 million birth, marriage and death records from the Netherlands are available online for the first time thanks to an agreement between Ancestry.com, the leader in family history and consumer genomics and CBG, the Netherlands Centre for Family History.

The collection is made up of indexes of civil registration records, population registers, church registers and family announcements from a comprehensive network of archive organisations within the Netherlands. Most of the records cover events from the 19th and 20th Century.

To date this collection has only been available in its entirety via the dedicated WieWasWie database, as operated by the Netherlands Centre for Family History. Now these records can be accessed and shared by Ancestry’s 2.5 million family history enthusiasts around the world.

Nikolai Donitzky, Ancestry’s Managing Director of Content for Europe, comments: “The Centre for Family History and regional archives have done a remarkable job in gathering and digitizing these records across the country. We are delighted to help share this extensive collection of Dutch records with a worldwide audience.” Leo Voogt (Executive Director of CBG) adds: We have worked with the archive community in the Netherlands to provide a unified window on all our joint genealogical records. Working with Ancestry.com will generate an enormous additional audience for these holdings and will drive new traffic to the sites of the participating institutions in the Netherlands.

The collection is available on Ancestry.com from 6th June, 2016.

June 9, 2016

Born 100 Years Apart But Will Their Paths Cross?

Katie Donnelly had no idea of the twists and turns her life would take when she left Ireland for New York in 1878. 

Janie Riley, born almost 100 years later, was only going to Salt Lake City to research her 4th great-grandmother. She too had no idea of what other adventures awaited her.

Will their paths cross? What, if anything, will bring them together?

Janie Riley has a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. Once in Salt Lake City, her search into the past leads her to more than she bargained for. The discovery of a dark secret brings her closer to danger. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present, and untangle a web of lies before disaster strikes? 

Find out in my new Genealogy Mystery Novel "Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery" now available on Amazon.com 

But first read a bit of Katie's story: 

The Steamer Baltic, April 5, 1878 

Sixteen-year-old Katie shivered in the cool morning air and pulled her woolen cloak tighter as she nudged her brother. Tendrils of glossy blue-back hair escaped from her hood and she impatiently pushed them back. “Joey!” a soft cry escaped Katie’s lips. “Look! That must be New York!” 

Brother and sister were standing on the deck of the ship that had brought them from Queenstown Ireland. The bow plunged through the murky water and the shoreline loomed closer. “Finally,” muttered Joey, “I can hardly wait to get off this damn thing and on to solid ground again!” 

The passage had not been an easy one. Joey had been ill for most of the voyage across the Atlantic. They were both happy to be on deck where the smell of salt air filled their nostrils. Being stuck below in steerage was miserable. Katie wasn’t sure she would ever get the smell of urine, vomit, and other body waste out of her nostrils. Babies with colic screamed long into the night, hungry children cried for hours, and passengers who were sick moaned and retched with horrible gagging noises. Women cried out in fear on hearing the ship groan and creak as its wooden hull protested with every wave that hit. Katie had taken to wrapping her cloak around her ears at night so that the dreadful sounds were muffled.

She shivered again, partially from the cold and partially from nerves. They were starting a new life in a foreign country. She remembered vividly the day Joey came in from the fields and she had to tell him that their beloved ma was gone. Pa had died of the fever just a few months before and their ma had followed not long after. 

Now here they were here in a city where they knew no one. Joey had a few pounds to see them through until they could find work but Katie was terrified it would not be enough. She hoped that the emigration agent had been telling the truth when he said jobs were there for the taking in New York City. She prayed she could find a position as a maid or downstairs kitchen girl in a good home, while Joey figured that with his strong muscles and young back he’d work on the docks or help in a stable. He was good with horses and even though he was only 18, no one knew more about gentling or taming a horse than he did. 

The cool wind had reddened Katie’s cheeks and they felt numb. She was glad the bad weather had finally lifted and she had something to look at besides waves and gray water. The sun was just coming up and Katie imagined she could feel a slight warmth from it already. She could hear the cries of gulls overhead, this sign of land bringing comfort to her.

Joey nudged her. “Katie, look! I think we’re coming into the harbor.” He pointed to an island on one side, mainland on the other and the narrowing gap of water between them. Their excitement, coupled with apprehension, built. What would happen now? How long would it take to get off the ship, find their baggage, and get on their way? But on their way where? [Excerpt from "Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery" by Lorine McGinnis Schulze]


Information on the author and her books, articles and interviews can be found at LorineSchulze.com



June 8, 2016

3 Sisters Meet After 50 Years Apart

Another incredible reunion story! I never get enough of these. Three sisters meet for the first time after 50 years apart.

A small quote from the Daily Mail website
  • From 1948-1965, a Minnesota mom gave up her four daughters 
  • None of them knew the others existed, but slowly found one another 
  • Now they are reunited with each other - and their biological mother
  • They say their story has hope for anyone who was abandoned or adopted
Read more at Reunited at last! Minnesota sisters who were all given up at birth finally meet each other - and their mom - after decades apart

June 7, 2016

Death Photography From the 19th Century

This story, and photos, may be upsetting for some of my readers. But it shows very well how times and customs change over the centuries and over the culture of the geographic location.

In the 19th Century it was a common practice in many countries, including England and the United States, to photograph a deceased loved one. Often the family member who had died was placed with the rest of the family for one final family photograph. Children especially were often memorialized in this fashion.

Taken from life: The unsettling art of death photography is a fascinating look at this custom from BBC News journalist .

Photo credit: Screenshot from BBC News article at http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-36389581

June 6, 2016

This is a Very Bad Idea!

Copyright protection is a very important issue, both online and offline. I have written about Copyright Issues many times on Olive Tree Genealogy blog. See Copyright Issues

Webmasters with copyrighted works for example, have protection against theft of their content. However the act that protects a webmaster can be (and is) abused!

"In May, the US Copyright Office came to San Francisco to hear from various stakeholders about how well Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act or DMCA is working.  The DMCA is the part of copyright law that provides for a “notice and takedown” process for copyrighted works on the Internet." [http://blog.archive.org/ Article by Lila Bailey]

DMCA notices can be sent in error or in spite, by a visitor who does not understand whether or not a webmaster has violated copyright, or bears a personal grudge against a webmaster. This happened to Steve Morse of One-Step Search Engine fame when a false DMCA notice was filed against him. Under the regulations, his site was taken down temporarily by his host server, while being investigated.

".... the Copyright Office is strongly considering recommending changing the DMCA to mandate a “Notice and Staydown” regime." [http://blog.archive.org/ Article by Lila Bailey]

Under this proposed legislation Steve Morse's site would never have been allowed back online!  This is a Very Bad Idea and I urge my readers to read the rest of the article Copyright Office’s Proposed Notice and Staydown System Would Force the Internet Archive and Other Platforms to Censor the Web

June 5, 2016

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album L11

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One. 

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"


June 4, 2016

Help Find Clarence Victor Sheppard 1929-1996 to Return Military Items to Family

Recently a request for help was posted on the Simcoe County Genealogy page on Facebook. Deborah C. posted (in part):

1972 Voters' List Orillia Ontario
"A few weeks ago, a friend of mine successfully bid on a soldier's service book and a few other items belonging to a man from Orillia. Clarence Victor SHEPPARD was born in Orillia 9 May 1929; died 17 November 1996 in the same area. He is buried at Bethel Cemetery in Kilworthy.  Clarence Sheppard enlisted in Toronto 5 June 1953; his service number was 24870. RCIC High Depot is written in his book, and POT driver mech. noted.  if anyone knows of any family members of Clarence Victor SHEPPARD, let us know so that we can contact them to see if they'd like this soldier's book etc that we found. "
If you have any information please post here as a comment or on the Facebook page or in private email to me (olivetreegenealogy@gmail.com). Let's see if we can find the family this soldier's items should go to.

June 3, 2016

Meet Linda Simpson Canadian Genealogist

Olive Tree Genealogy is delighted to introduce Linda Simpson. I interviewed Linda, a Canadian Genealogist, and can relate to her story of her start in genealogy. Read on to learn more about Linda and her blog.

1.How and when did you become involved in the field of genealogy?

 I started my research after I attended my maternal grand-fathers funeral. I was born in Montreal but moved to the states when I was four years old, and never had an opportunity to visit my relatives. Seeing the cemetery and the family plot in Saint- Hyacinthe, QC and being gifted a box of family photographs from a cherished Aunt set my path.

2.     What is your main genealogical focus?   

Although I have researched both sides of my family, my French-Irish side is where I focus my research, I want to know who they were, not just when they were born or died. 
 
3.      What are your website(s) and blogs?  The Past Whispers  

4.     Do you have a Social Media presence?   Linda Simpson and Canadian History & Genealogy

 
5.     Do you believe a Social Media presence is important?


I embrace technology so for me social media was something I was eager to learn, I’ve since connected with long lost family and friends that never would have happened outside of Facebook.
 
6.     Are you a member of any genealogical societies or organizations? 

 Quebec Family History Society, American-French Genealogical Society, Scarborough Historical Society.
 
7.     What does genealogy mean to you? Why do you believe it is important? 

 For me it means connecting, in a way, with people I will never meet, to learn about their daily lives in another era.
 
8.     What do you believe is the most exciting development in genealogy today? 

For me it has been online research. Living in a country outside of ones research is a handicap, with online resources the search is easier.
 
9.     Do you have a prediction or hope for the field of genealogy in the future? 

I hope more and more records are indexed and placed online especially Canadian census. I also hope that more of the younger generation will become interested in their heritage, to keep them alive so to speak.
 
******* For more Canadian Genealogists Interviews, please see

June 2, 2016

Making Gift Books From Blog Posts

If you write a genealogy blog, you might want to have some fun with Blog2Print.com 

I spent 45 minutes last week at this site creating a small book featuring specific blog posts on my Sharing Memories meme.

This meme ran every Sunday for 5 years and featured sharing childhood memories in order to preserve them.

By telling Blog2Print to only gather blog posts from 2014 that had the keyword "Sharing Memories", a 40 page book was quickly and easily created. I will give these books to my children for birthday or Christmas gifts, and hopefully my grandchildren will enjoy them too.

Disclaimer: I do not have any affiliation with Blog2Print and they did not ask me to write this post, nor do I receive anything from them for it. 




June 1, 2016

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick - The Story of the Loyalist Storm Follick


Storm Follick aka Vollick, son of Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick, left New York during the American Revolution. Eventually the family arrived in the wilderness of Upper Canada in 1782 as impoverished Loyalists. They settled in the Niagara area with other disbanded soldiers from Butler's Rangers. There Storm met and married Ester.

With their children Storm and Ester carved a life in this new land. Descendants will find documents, photographs, newspaper clippings and information about Storm, his wife Ester, and their children and grandchildren in this 108 page Family history book.

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V. 3: The Loyalist Storm Follick and his Follick and Vollick descendants in North America by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Available on CreateSpace and Amazon.com soon available on Amazon.ca

 8.5" x 11" (21.59 x 27.94 cm)
Full Color on White paper
108 pages