November 30, 2014

Interview for Newspaper on Military History

Recently I was interviewed by an Edmonton Newspaper for an article about Researching Military History. I was honoured to be consulted and pleased with the published piece.

Please see the article "Researching a Military History"  in the Edmonton Sun

I hope I was able to provide other genealogists with ideas and suggestions they will find helpful.

November 29, 2014

Identifyiing Old Photographs Part 3

The following article was originally written by Lorine McGinnis Schulze and published on Olive Tree Genealogy at http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/photos/photo-types.shtml

It may not be reproduced in any way without my written consent.

Carte de Visite or CDVs (ca 1859)

CDV stands for carte de visite, a photographic calling card. The CDV process, which began in France in 1854, involved a special camera that produced eight poses on one negative. The CDV quickly replaced the old glass images of the ambrotypes, producing a card the size of the then standard calling card, around 2.5 by 4".

The CDV’s albumen process produced a negative from which any number of prints could be made - and on early CDVs it was important for the photographer to note that more prints were always available.

CDVs arrived in the United States around 1859, on the eve of the Civil War (1861-1865) during which demand skyrocketed as soldiers and their loved ones sought an affordable image remembrance. Many people began collecting portraits of political figures, actors and actresses, Civil War generals, as well as family and friends. Special photo albums were designed especially for cartes-de-visite.

In the United States, the carte-de-visite played second fiddle to cheaper variations on the daguerreotype theme. Thus the early CDVs are rather uncommon. CDV with square corners ca 1872CDV with square corners pre 1872  Example of CDV with rounded corners Civil War Era - Jemima Van SlykeCDV with rounded corners after 1872. Jemima Van Slyke< CDV with corners cut to fit album. You must use fashion clues, revenue stamps or photographer logo or name to date the photograph 

Next  I will talk about  Cabinet Cards. Also see my YouTube Video Five Types of Early 19th Century Photographs 

November 28, 2014

Book Review: The Tiny Portrait

The Tiny Portrait by Heidi Carla is a wonderful children's book about a brother and sister who find a family treasure in their attic. Tess finds a cased portrait of a young woman with her dog, labelled "Lottie & Pearl" When the portrait begins to fade, Tess and her brother Toby decide they need to find out who Lottie was. Their first clue is the year "1890" on the photograph and then Tess finds Lottie's diary.

Then Tess begins to see Lottie everywhere she goes - a shadowy figure who seems to lead the children to places they need to go to find the answers. The children embark on a journey of discovery - not only finding out who Lottie was but discovering that sometimes the greatest treasure of all is the memories the object invokes. 

Beautifully illustrated with sepia toned photographs done by the author's sister Karla Cinquanta, this book is an enchanting venture into the world of genealogy and early photography. 

My 9 year old grandson looked through The Tiny Portrait and proclaimed it "very interesting" He liked that it was about (in his words) "Family trees" and he loved the photographs. He spent quite a bit of time poring over the illustrations and when I asked him what the appeal was, his answer was "I like the details"

This book is a delightfully creative way for genealogists to introduce children or grandchildren to the world of genealogy. The Tiny Portrait is available on Amazon.

Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this book for review purposes 

November 27, 2014

American Thanksgiving

American Thanksgiving
Happy Thanksgiving to all those in the United States who are celebrating this holiday today.

I often wonder which of my American ancestors celebrated this special day with family.

My last ancestor from USA (Levi Peer) left that country in 1801. Would he have celebrated with family? I don't know!

Last night we took our grandsons out for a "Festive Holiday Meal" here in Ontario Canada. We don't celebrate Thanksgiving in November. Ours is in October but one of our chain restaurants is offering Christmas (yes, Christmas!) meals now so that is what we had. I told the boys we were celebrating American Thanksgiving one day early. 

Enjoy your special day!

November 26, 2014

Finding an Ancestor in Almshouse Records

Almshouse records are often overlooked in Genealogy Research but they can provide lots of great information on an ancestor. People were sent to almshouses for being poor, for not having a steady job or for other reasons.

Finding an Ancestor in Almshouse Records
Erie County New York Almshoue
Olive Tree Genealogy has several sets of Almshouse records online at Almshouses & Poorhouses.  Below are a few of them

* New York Almshouse Records 1782-1813. Records contain name of ancestor, date admitted, age, where from or born, complaint [illness], discharged, died, remarks. Start with New York Almshouse 1782-1813 Surnames "A"

* Almshouse Records New York 1819-1840 [An Olive Tree Genealogy free database]

* It's not an Almshouse & Poorhouse but I didn't know where else to put this incredible database - a List of those who died while in Staten Island Quarantine May 1849 - Dec. 1850 [An Olive Tree Genealogy free database]

* Almshouse Records New York City 1855-1858 [An Olive Tree Genealogy free database]

Looking for British ancestors in America? Try Child Apprentices (Orphans & Impoverished Children) in America from Christ's Hospital, London 1617-1778: Child Apprentice Surnames [B][C][D][E] [F] [G] [H] [I] [J] [K] [L] [M] [N] [O] [R][S] [T][U] [V] [W] [Y] [Z]

November 25, 2014

Lost & Found: Looking for Kenneth Dean Ostrander or Descendants

Jane T. asked for help finding family to return a 1919 postcard and photo she recently purchased in an antique store. Here is her email

I found this photo post card in a store in Stirling, ON today. Written on the back is "Kenneth Dean Ostrander, age 4 mos, 1919 Jan. To Myrtle Hubbs from Vera" Would be great to reunite it with a family member.


Kenneth Dean Ostrander, age 4 mos, 1919 Jan. To Myrtle Hubbs from Vera"
Kenneth Dean Ostrander,
age 4 mos, 1919 Jan.
To Myrtle Hubbs from Vera
Lorine's Note:

The 1921 census (free on Ancestry.com) shows a Kenneth Ostrander age 2 in Hallowell Township, Prince Edward District, son of Harold and Vera Ostrander. He has a brother Donald 8 months old.

There are also dozens of records in the 1940s and 1950s for a Dean Kenneth Ostrander born ca 1919 flying for KLM Airlines as a 2nd Officer.

A 2012 obituary for his brother Donald Ostrander reveals that Kenneth Dean pre-deceased him.

Can any of my wonderful readers help find Kenneth Dean Ostrander's family? There are lots of nieces and nephews names in this obituary.

Please leave your findings as a comment on this blog post. Let's get this lovely postcard and photo home before Christmas!












November 24, 2014

Identifying Photographs Part 2

The following article was originally written by Lorine McGinnis Schulze and published on Olive Tree Genealogy at http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/photos/photo-types.shtml

It may not be reproduced in any way without my written consent.

Tintypes (circa 1855)

The Ferrotype process (tintypes) was introduced in the United States in 1855. It substituted an iron plate for glass and was even cheaper than the ambrotype. Because tintypes were placed in albums along with CDVs, they were often trimmed at the sides and corners. Tintypes were produced in various sizes
  • Full plate 6 1/2" x 8 1/2"
  • Half plate 4 1/2" x 51/2"
  • 1/4 plate 3 1/8" x 4 1/8"
  • 1/6 plate 2 1/2" x 3 1/2"
  • 1/9 plate 2" x 2 ½"
  • Gem approximately 1/2" x 1" 
Example of Gem tintype in Oval Matte ca 1860sGem tintype ca 1860s. A Gem tintype could be 3/4" to 1" wide. Carte de visite sized card mounts (2½"x4") enclosed the gem and the finished item was known as a carte de visite tintype or ferrotype
photo-tintype 1.5x2.5 Civil War Soldier9th plate ( 2 x 2.5) tintype in matte. Civil War Soldier
tintype 2.5x46th plate (2.5 x 3.5) tintype.

Next up I will talk about  Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards. Also see my YouTube Video Five Types of Early 19th Century Photographs 


November 23, 2014

Help Send a WW1 Soldier's Cap Badge Back to Family

Michael L. wrote to me about a cap badge he found many years ago. Here is Mike's story:


I am looking for descendants of a John Orr who served in WW1 and lived in Oshawa in 1926. I have a hat badge that I recently traced to him and would give it to a descendant of his. I found it in my mothers’ garden around 1943.It is from the Canadian Highlanders Regiment. A few years ago I was curious and looked up who had lived in the house before my parents moved in. John Orr was living there in 1926. Last year I found a site with Attestation papers. I found John Orrs’ papers and he was in the Canadian Highlanders. If you could find a relative that would be great to give it to them.


Help Send a WW1 Soldier's Cap Badge Back to Family
The cap badge reads 

THE ROYAL HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA
 13th BATT 1st CANADIAN DIVISION
A search of the online CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force) database brings up Captain John Orr born 27 August 1890 in Wishaw, Scotland, enlisting on 23 September 1914. His Regimental Number is 24908
His mother Helen is given as his next-of-kin and he was single. 
I did some research and found the family in the 1881, 1891 and 1901 census for Wishaw, Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire Scotland. His father was Andrew, his mother Helen and John had many older siblings.
John Orr Attestation Paper front
I was able to put together a family grouping of:
Father: Andrew Orr born ca 1849 Liberton Lanarkshire
Mother: Helen born ca 1851 Stonehouse Lanarkshire
Children:
  • Marion b ca 1875
  • Adam b ca 1877
  • James b ca 1879
  • Elizabeth b ca 1881
  • Janet b ca 1884
  • Mary b ca 1886
  • Andrew Jr. b ca 1889
  • John b. ca 1891 
I have not done any more research to find John Orr after his enlistment in the CEF in 1914 but he might appear in the 1921 Canadian census and on a ships passenger list arriving in Canada between 1901 and 1914. 

If any of my readers want to help find descendants so the cap badge could be returned to family, please leave responses as a comment on this blog. If you have information on living descendants it will not be published online but I will pass it on to Mike L.  

What a terrific thing if we can send this cap badge to family!

November 22, 2014

Photoduplication Services To be Discontinued at FamilySearch

Photoduplication Services To be Discontinued at FamilySearch
Genealogists will be disappointed to learn that  Photoduplication Services provided by FamilySearch are being discontinued as of December 5, 2014. As of this date, existing orders will be completed, but new orders will not be accepted. 

This would be the time for someone living in the Salt Lake City area and looking to make some extra money to step in and offer to retrieve documents for a reasonable fee. I know I'd use their services. 

I realize films can be ordered in to a nearby Family History Center and that's great if you live near one or are physically able to get out to one. I am one of those who can't access one.

Hopefully the termination of this service won't be too much of a negative impact on researchers but I for one will be sorry to see it go.

November 21, 2014

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Album 31 R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.  

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain. 

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission. 

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page. 

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos" in the vertical menu bar on the right side of your screen. You can also click on that phrase at the bottom of this post.

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Album 31 R
X-Ray Room

November 20, 2014

Immigrants to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819

I've been working on a project called Immigrants proceeding to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819

Immigrants to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819.  Pass for George Underhill
Pass #17236 George Underhill, Shropshire, butcher
I have extracted the names and basic information for each of the 199 people who applied for passes to leave New York and enter Upper Canada (present day Ontario)  The actual passes contain more information including age, place of origin, occupation, how many in family and sometimes detailed notes about the immigrant.

The passes begin at Image 33 with number 17228. To find an ancestor pass, just find the name in the list at Immigrants proceeding to Upper Canada via New York 1817-1819 , copy the pass number then go to 
Canadiana.org and paste the pass number into the search engine that says "Search within this reel"




For example one name on the list is 

17236 George Underhill, Shropshire, butcher, wife + 4 ch

If this were your ancestor you would use the Canadiana.org link above and enter 17266 into the search engine on that site. You can see his pass above.
 
[Source: Upper Canada Sundries, Reference: RG 5 A1, Volume 37, passes numbered 17228-17578, microfilm: C-4601. Civil Secretary's Correspondence - Passes signed by British Consul, New York, for Emigrants from Great Britain, 1817-1819. Microfilm available at Canadiana.org but it is not indexed] 

November 19, 2014

Manifest Markings: What was "British Bonus Allowed" on Canadian Passenger Lists?

Understanding the Term "British Bonus Allowed"  on Canadian Passenger Lists 1890-1906
British Bonus Allowed
The British Bonus was a commission paid by the Canadian government's Immigration Branch to steamship booking agents in the United Kingdom and in European countries for each suitable immigrant who purchased a ticket to sail to Canada. The immigrants themselves did not receive the bonus, although those who settled on western homesteads did receive a separate monetary bonus upon proof of settlement.

As such, the "British Bonus" was a subtle marketing tool used by the Canadian government; it served to encourage steamship booking agents to recruit desirable settlers (farmer, domestics, etc.). The laws of the time in many European countries forbade open encouragement of immigration by any foreign country.

The British Bonus came into effect through the passage of an Order-in-Council on September 27, 1890. It provided the following provisions.

  1. To pay a limited amount, not exceeding in any case $50.00, to the class of "returned men" (not exceeding fifty) to Europe toward recouping their expenses on sufficient proof furnished of success in bringing immigrants to Canada.
  2. To pay a bonus to Steamship Agents in the United Kingdom, of $5.00 for each adult settler on land, of 18 years and over, on certificate of booking and shipping such settler to Manitoba, the Northwest Territories of British Columbia, and, on certificate of a Dominion Lands Agent, to be furnished as proof of such settler.
  3. To pay a bonus of $10.00 to each homesteader, the head of a family, and $5.00 for each member of such family at the adult age of 12 years and over, with an additional $5.00 to any such member of a family who might within six months after arrival in Canada become a homesteader on settlement on land in Manitoba, the Northwest Territories of British Columiba, proof being furnished of such settlement by the certificate of a Dominion Lands Agent.
While the arrangement above was in place, many suggestions were received by the Department recommending that the regulations be altered so that a bonus would be payable when the immigrant arrived in Canada instead of when he took up land. It was finally agreed to pay of bonus of $1.75 on adults and half that amount on children from the British Isles arriving in Winnipeg, Manitoba. This system remained in effect until April 1, 1906 with the exception that in later years it applied to immigrants to eastern as well as Western Canada. In the year 1904-05, 146,266 immigrants arrived at Canada of which the British bonus was paid on 28,835.

The stamp "British Bonus Allowed" was stamped against the name of applicable passengers on manifests. Other, similar, notations included "C.G.E.A. which was the abbreviation for the Canadian Government Employment Agent (these agents received a commission from the government for placing newly-arrived immigrants with employers who were seeking labourers or domestics; and "Continental Bonus" which was established in 1882 and were similar to the British Bonus but applied to emigrants from the European mainland.



November 18, 2014

WW2 Letter re Death of A. F. Johnson Found in Street

The letter details how Sgt Anthony Frederick Johnson, a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force, went missing during an air operation in April 1943.

Signed by Wing Commander D.H. Burnside, of the No. 427 squadron, the letter tells the parents of Sgt Johnson that their son was a popular figure and fast becoming an ace wireless operator. 

The wing commander writes: “On the night of April 16, at approximately nine o’clock, Anthony and his crew took off from this aerodrome to carry out a bombing attack over enemy territory and were due to return at four o’clock in the morning. 

“Unfortunately, the aircraft never returned and we have heard nothing from it or any member of the crew since time of take-off.” [Hexham Courant News]
WW2 Letter re Death of A. F. Johnson Found in Street
Screenshot from Hexham Courant Article
The Courant has informed both the Royal Canadian Air Force, and the Library and Archives Canada, about the letter. The Courant hope to hear from descendants or anyone who has details about Sgt Johnson.

Read more at Second World War letter found on village street in the Hexham Courant News

Lorine's Note: I believe this site has quite a bit of information on Sgt. Johnson but I am not a member. If any of my readers is a member it would be wonderful to know what details are found. 

November 17, 2014

Identifying Early Photographs

The following article was originally written by Lorine McGinnis Schulze and published on Olive Tree Genealogy at http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/photos/photo-types.shtml

It may not be reproduced in any way without my written consent.

Daguerreotypes (ca 1839)

Photography arrived in the United States in 1839 thanks to Samuel F. B. Morse, an American artist and inventor. Morse visited Daguerre in Paris in March 1839 and observed a demonstration of the daguerreotype process. He returned to the United States to spread the news, and by the end of 1839 some larger cities on the East Coast had very successful portrait studios.
daguerreotype 6th plate 1854 Franklin Amos Pratt 6th plate Daguerreotype taken ca 1854

Ambrotypes (circa 1854)

The ambrotype was a glass negative backed with black material, which enabled it to appear as a positive image. Patented in 1854, the ambrotype was made, packaged, and sold in portrait studios as the daguerreotype had been, but at a lower cost. The ambrotype produced a single image on glass.
9th plate Ambrotype ca 1858 9th plate Ambrotype ca 1858
1861 Ambrotype 6th plate Ambrotype 1861
Next up I will talk about Tintypes, Cartes de Visite and Cabinet Cards. Also see my YouTube Video Five Types of Early 19th Century Photographs 

November 16, 2014

Oldest DNA Ever Found

Oldest DNA Ever Found
A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago. Subjected to DNA testing, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals who just recently were found to have interbred with humans before disappearing. In fact Neanderthal DNA is found in all modern humans except Africans. Up to 4% of our DNA can be Neanderthal. 

I've had mine tested and it is over 3%. The bone found had tiny amounts of Neanderthal DNA but it was in relatively long strips, whereas Neanderthal DNA in modern human genome has been cut up and dispersed in tiny sections as a result of generations of reproduction.

This find is allowing scientists to work out a "calendar" of when Homo Sapiens headed into South Asia. The team calculates it was no more than 60,000 years ago.


More information can be found at Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

November 15, 2014

57 Graves Found Under Church Parking Lot

Recently 57 century old graves were found when a church parking lot was dug up in Toronto Ontario Canada. The church was originally built in the Village of Weston in the 1850s. The coffins and grave markers date as far back as 1866. The church is St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church and so far no burial records have surfaced. 

An old photo, which you can see at  Dozens of old graves found under Toronto church parking lot appears to show a cemetery beside the church. 

That cemetery has not been visible for many years and the suspicion is that the parking lot was built over top of the graves. 


November 14, 2014

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album L12

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.  

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain. 

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission. 

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page. 

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos" in the vertical menu bar on the right side of your screen. You can also click on that phrase at the bottom of this post.

Loose newspaper clipping, titled "Operating Room Staff, No. 2 Canadian General Hospital, Bramshott"
Loose newspaper clipping, titled "Operating Room Staff, No. 2 Canadian General Hospital, Bramshott"

November 13, 2014

Jan Corneliszen Damen In The New World Part 4

Several years ago I wrote an article for publication in New Netherland Connections. it was about my ancestor and 9th great-grandfather Jan Damen who left Bunnik Netherland for the New World of New Netherland (present day New York state) in the mid 17th century. Jan settled in Long Island New York and married Sophia (Fytie) Martens.

My article Jan Corneliszen Damen In The New World was published on pages 47-56 of Volume 4, number 2 (May 1999) as a companion piece to another article called The Nephews of Jan Jansz Damen by Dorothy Koenig and Pim Nieuwenhuis in Volume 4, Number 2 May 1999 pages 36-39. The two nephews discussed were Jan Cornelisz Buys (aka Damen) who had three wives, 1) Eybe Lubberts, 2) Phebe Sales, and 3) Willemptje Thyssen; and his first cousin (my ancestor), Jan Cornelisz Damen, who married Fytje Martens. 

Five Members of the Utrecht Brotherhood of Jerusalem Pilgrims by Jan van Scorel ca 1541
Far right: My 13th great grandfather Jan Damen 1515-1569,
2nd great grandfather of Jan Damen 1638-1707 
Five Members of the Utrecht Brotherhood of Jerusalem Pilgrims
painting by Jan van Scorel ca 1541
I have decided to republish the first 3 pages of my article here on my Olive Tree Genealogy blog.  I hope that descendants of Jan and other genealogists enjoy this story of Jan's life in New York. This is the last episode - Part 4, continuing on from Part 1, 2 and 3.
Jan Corneliszen Damen In The New World

by Lorine McGinnis Schulze
 
As John Damon [sic] and Seytie Damon of Broockland [sic], Jan and Sophia conveyed land to Gerratt Middagh on 15 December 1693[1] This was a small section of a larger portion of land at the Wallabout, which, on 10 May 1695, "John Damon of Wallabout and Fitie his wife" deeded to William Huddlestone of New York. Jan and Sophia deeded all except the six acres which had previously been deeded to Gerrit Middagh in 1693.[2]  On 2 May 1696, William Huddlestone and his wife Sarah deeded John Damon [sic] the same property described above.[3] Jan was approximately 60 years of age and it is possible he was selling land for money to support himself and Sophia.



Jan Damen appears in the 1698 census for "Brookland" Kings County - with his wife, four children and one slave[4] That the Damen family owned slaves is also indicated by  the town of Flatbush census for 1698 where James Simpson, Jan's son in law, has four slaves. In this same census for the town of Bushwick, Jan's sons-in-law Michael Parmentier and Pieter Uziele appear - Michael owning two slaves and Pieter none.



            In 1701 Jan and Sophia stood for the last time as baptismal sponsors  -  at the christening of Jannetje, their granddaughter by their daughter Lysbeth Schermerhorn.[5] Jan Damen voted at a town meeting in Flatbush, New York on 19 Jan. 1703, 1704 and again on 12 Aug. 1704.[6] Between the summer of 1704 and  the spring of 1707 Jan died - his age somewhere between 69 and 72.



His was probated on 20 June 1707 but he had died prior to 9 April 1707, as indicated in a deed of that date made by Michael Parmentier and wife Neeltie Damen.[7] This deed is very important in helping to determine the children of Jan Damen and Sophia as it named the following sisters of Neeltie and their respective spouses:



"Martha Simpson, of Flatbush; Pieter Uziell and Cornelia, his wife, of Dutchess Co.; Samuell Phillips and Aelkie, his wife, of New York; Lucas Skermorhorne and Elizabeth, wife, of Dutchess Co.; Frans Konin and Selia, his wife, of Dutchess Co.; Philip Casier of Richmond Co. heir to his mother Lyshie; Russia Damon of Flatbush; To Daniell Remsen; said Neltye, Martha, Cornelia, Aelkie, Elizabeth, Selia, Lyshie and Russia being daughters and co-heirs of John Damon [sic] late of Flatbush, deceased." [8]


[1] LISr: Book No. 2 of Conveyances, Brooklyn Kings Co.: p. 343 John Damon [sic] and Seytie Damon of Broockland [sic], his wife, to Gerratt Middagh of same place, conveys lott of ground greatt 3 morgan dutch measure, bounded East side by land of Garrett Couwenhoven, on the other side after the land of John Damon, and before alongst the meadow begining from a black oake tree from the side of Garrett Couwenhoven towards said John Dimon [sic], in breadth 17 rod until it comes to three morgan dutch measure, dated 15 Dec. 1693 - signed in the presence of Rutgard Huggen De Kleuyn, Jacobus Vandwater. Rec'd Decr. 23, 1693. Henry Filkin, Justice
[2] ibid: p. 69 In this deed both Jan and Sophia sign, he by mark. Witnesses were Paul Richards, Manus Burger and Peter Ziene [sic] [This is Pieter Uziele aka Ziele, who married Cornelia Janse and Fytie Damen] The deed was acknowledged  before Stephanus Van Cortlandt in New York, 29 May 1695, and recorded there June 11 by William Sharpas, Clerk and Rec'd in Brooklyn, Aug 23, 1695 by Henry ffilkin, Reg.
[3] ibid: p. 93. Both signed the deed. Witnessed  by Thomas Adams and Samuel Philips [Jan's son in law]. Acknowledged in New York before William Beeckman, Justice, May 2, 1696 and in Brooklyn before Henry ffilkin, May 2, 1696. Rec'd same day.
[4] DHNY: Kings County, NY 1698 Census Townships: Brooklyn, Bushwick, Flatbush, Flatlands, Gravesend, and  New Utrecht. Volume III, pp. 87-89
[5] RDCNY. 1883 V14:4. 1701 29 Oct; Lucas Schermerhoorn, Lysbeth Damen; Jannetje; Jan Damen & wife Sytje Martens
[6] KCo. P. 83.
[7]  LISr. Wills p.100. Deed dated Apl. [sic] 9, 1707 by Michael Parmentier of Duchess Co. and Neltye his wife.
[8] Here is proof of two daughters with the same name (Elizabeth or Lysbeth), one called Elizabeth, the second Lyshie - both alive at the same time. Elizabeth was married to Lucas Schermerhorn; Lyshie to Jan Casier. Frans Konin is Frans LeRoy - his French name meaning "King" is recorded as the Dutch version of "King" [Koning] Russia is the child baptised as Risjen. Martha is Marte, who married first Jan Remsen and secondly, James Simpson

November 12, 2014

Orphan Album: Swiss Photo Album with Chimney Sweeps

Recently Alice H. wrote to me about an antique photo album  she purchased many years ago.


I have a very old photo album that I purchased at an antique store many years ago & have been looking for a place to send it. if you would like to have them just send me an address & they will be yours.. I hate to see them waste away.
Orphan Album: Swiss Photo Album with Chimney Sweeps

 Alice went on to add that she bought the album many years ago in Glendale Arizona but that no one in the store knew anything about where they came from originally. The photos are from Switzerland with a few from Germany and none of the individuals are identified by name.

I plan to scan and publish the photos on Lost Faces in hopes someone might recognize an ancestor. All the photos are CDVs (Cartes de Visite) and appear to be from 1860s-1880s.

CDV Chimney Sweeps
Here is one that really interested me. It appears to be a photo of three Chimney Sweeps. Note their ladder and brooms and traditional Chimney Sweep top hats. All of them are wearing small shovels used to rake out ashes. I do not know if these shovels on their lapels are an insignia or actual working tools.



Chimney Sweeps Verso
J. ZURKIRCH RHEINECK und ALTSTAEDTEN
1885


November 11, 2014

The Horrors of War - Broken Bodies of Civil War Soldiers

 War is a horrific event. Terrible things happen and young men and women die. The following photos and links to two sites with more photos may be disturbing to some readers. But they show the reality of war. 

The following photos are of Civil War soldiers who were grievously injured and whose wounds and hasty operations left them in a bad way. We can only imagine how difficult life must have been for many of them after returning home.There are dozens of photographs, some very disturbing, all of them distressing, on the Flickr photostream of
National Museum of Health & Medicine

I believe we need to view these photos to remember what horrors war can bestow and to honour all soldiers for their bravery.

Adolphus D. Campbell
National Museum of Health and Medicine

Contributed Photograph 1331

CAMPBELL, ADOLPHUS D.
 EXCISIONS OF BONES OF FOREARM. (VERSO)

LT Company F 45th PENNSYLVANIA
 Battle of PETERSBURG, VA  30 JULY 1864

Contributed by HUDSON, DR. E.D. 1876
Photograph by T.G. DIMMERS











The Horrors of War - Broken Bodies of Civil War Soldiers
Cpt. David D. Cole
National Museum of Health and Medicine



 Cpt. David D. Cole, National Museum of Health and Medicine

 Disarticulated of the knee joint. Cpl. David D. Cole, Co. A, 2nd New York Cavalry. Wounded 3 April 1865 at the Battle of Amelia Courthouse. Treated by Dr. George M. McGill. Photographed by H. Hirschinger, 388 Bowery, New York. Contributed by E.D. Hudson.

 

For more photos see National Museum of Health & Medicine on Flickr

Also see Civil War Portraits of the Broken Bodies Sent Home



Credits: Licence for distribution

November 10, 2014

What's Black and White and "RED" All Over?

What's Black and White and "RED" All Over? A Newspaper! 

Of course you knew the answer but did you know how much fun historic newspapers are and what great stories you can find about an ancestor? Sometimes you find an obituary or a bankruptcy notice. Other times you find a lurid story of death and deceit. 

Leamington Spa Courier - Friday 17 March 1905
 As genealogists we love those exciting bits of news, so much so that I often think we lose sight of the humanity attached to the story. I try hard not to forget about the sorrow, the pain and yes the joy experienced by the ancestors I read about in newspapers. But it is easy to forget they were just like us and felt the same emotions we do. 

Yesterday I found a newspaper article from 1905 about the death of a friend's ancestor. I was pretty excited because the headline was "FATAL FALL" and the very first sentence began with  

"Richard Booker was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Frederick Mustin...."





Leamington Spa Courier - Friday 17 March 1905
A murder! Wow. Who doesn't want an ancestor who was murdered? Or better yet, was a murderer? As I read on, my initial reaction of excitement changed to  disappointment. It turns out that Frederick, 84 years old, was arguing with Richard, a much younger man. When Frederick raised his crutch to threaten Richard, Richard pushed him away and Frederick fell. And that was it. The verdict was that Frederick died of a heart attack, no doubt brought on by the excitement and commotion of the argument. After a trial Richard was found not guilty of murder or manslaughter. 
And thus what I hoped was a lurid story was simply a story of two men arguing and a sad accident leading to the death of one of them. I hadn't given one thought to Frederick's daughter who was in the house at the time. What would her reaction have been to the sounds of the argument and the sight of her father lying dead on the sofa? And what about Richard Booker? How did he feel? According to the newspaper story he was quite distraught over what had happened.

What other family did Frederick leave behind? How were they affected by his death? These are the questions I try to ask myself when I find a newspaper story about an ancestor. It is too easy to get caught up in the "the more lurid the better!" mentality of genealogy research.

I suspect that our fascination with the lurid, the dramatic and the unusual is due to the very nature of genealogy research. It's essentially a dry study - full of names and dates and a few essential facts but with no real substance.  Rarely do we get a sense of the person behind the name attached to birth, marriage and death dates. Were they a good person or a nasty bit of goods? Would we like them? It's not easy to learn the character and personality of an ancestor from the ordinary events of life. So finding a newspaper article with something exciting and out of the ordinary is a way of not only putting meat on those bones but also of perking us up and bringing some excitement to what otherwise can feel at times like drudgery. 

Don't get me wrong - I love researching my ancestors! I have been hooked since I was 14 years old. I love the thrill of the hunt, the excitement of the chase and the joy at finding one tiny little tidbit of information. But let's face it, it can get tedious looking at frame after frame or page after page or hunting for days, weeks, months and years for one fact. 

But I do think we need to remember that our ancestors lived, laughed, cried and loved just as we do. So the next time you find an exciting and dramatic event in your ancestor's life, take a minute to reflect on how it affected that person and everyone who loved them. 

And if you aren't subscribed to any historic Newspaper sites you might want to think about asking for a subscription to one for Christmas. You never know what you might find.

November 9, 2014

No. 4 of My Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries - Jacob Peer

A Facebook friend recently posted her top 10 Genealogy Mysteries.  They aren't brick walls because there is probably an answer somewhere, just waiting to be found.

I thought this was a great idea and I am following suit with my Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries. Of course any help or suggestions for further research are welcome. You can read my other Genealogy Mysteries at Top 10 Genealogy Mysteries

Here is my Number 4 of 10 Genealogy Mysteries:

Jacob Peer ca 1728/38 - 1810/15

Jacob Peer, sometimes recorded as Pear, the immigrant ancestor to Ontario, was living in Newton Township. Sussex County New Jersey in 1774. Jacob married Ann or Anna (surname not known) sometime before 1760.  At least two of his children were married in Frankford Township Sussex County New Jersey in 1782 and 1787 but Jacob has not been found prior to this 1774 date. 

Timeline of Jacob & Anna Peer in New Jersey before they settled in Ontario Canada

1774: Newton Township Sussex County New Jersey

28 April 1784: bought 96 acres of land from Phillip & Mary Riggs, Lot #1 in Newton Township Sussex Co.



1793 June Tax Lists, NewTown, New Jersey - Philip Pear (It is almost certain that Jacob Sr. was with his son Philip at this time. Note their entry into Ontario from New Jersey together in June 1796)



14 Feb. 1794: Petition with Jacob Pear’s signature, 14 Feb 1794, to the Court of Commen Pleas from inhabitants of Sussex County recommending that six surveyors be appointed to Meet at the House of Jacob Pear in Newtown to Relay or lay a Road from the Main Road leading from Newtown to Decker town acrost by Said Pears to a certian Road leading from Thomas Armstrongs to the Bigg Spring.



 3 May 1794 bought 6 acres of land from Silas & Mary Hopkins, Lot #2 in Newton Township Sussex Co. Lot #2 lays adjacent to Lot #1 and Sharps Great Tract on Pepocotting.


1796, June: came to province from New Jersey with son Philip

Where was Jacob before 1774? Who were his parents?  His children's names were Levi, John, Edward, Philip, Phoebe, Mercy/Marci, Jacob Jr. & Stephen. Perhaps his two first-born sons were named in honour of his father and his wife Anna's father? Could his two daughters be in honour of their grandmothers? If so, I might theorize that Jacob's parents could have been

Levi & Phoebe
Levi & Marci/Mercy
John & Phoebe
John & Marci/Mercy

However I can't find any couples with the surname Peer, Pier or Pear that fit the names above. I've done extensive research on this family and have written a 108 page book on Jacob & Anna (The Peer Family in North America. V1 Jacob & Anne Peer, Immigrants from New Jersey to Upper Canada in 1796. A study of the first two generations) but I have yet to solve the mystery of Jacob Peer's origins and parents.